Quick Test Could Spot Precursor to Esophageal Cancer

FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A pill-sized device that you swallow might help detect a change in the esophagus that can lead to a deadly form of cancer, researchers are reporting. The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. And the change that occurs in the esophagus, known as Barrett’s esophagus, usually results from long-term reflux. Barrett’s esophagus is considered a precursor to a type of cancer called esophageal adenocarcinoma. More than 80 percent of people diagnosed with this cancer die within…

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How to Share Your Story—And Help Save Lives

Voices on Cancer is an award-winning Cancer.Net Blog series where advocates share their stories and the lessons they have learned about being a cancer advocate. Tamika Felder is the founder of Cervivor, a nonprofit organization that brings the collective wisdom of cervical cancer survivors together to create a community of advocates. She’s committed to eradicating the stigma of cervical cancer’s link to the human papillomavirus (HPV) and sharing essential information about HPV, cervical cancer, and cervical cancer prevention. When I was diagnosed with cervical cancer, I never planned on becoming a patient…

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Health Tip: Perform Regular Skin Checks

(HealthDay News) — Many skin cancers can be found early if you perform regular skin checks at home, the American Cancer Society says. The best time to do a monthly exam is right after a bath or shower. You should check for any new or changed moles, blemishes or birthmarks. Here are the Cancer Society’s suggestions for performing a skin check: Face a mirror and check your face, ears, neck, chest and belly. Women should also examine their breasts and surrounding areas. Check your underarms, both sides of…

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I Survived Melanoma and I Want You to Know: Indoor Tanning Is Dangerous

Ashley Drury, 30, is a Florida native and stage 4 melanoma survivor. I started using indoor tanning beds in high school and was instantly addicted to everything about them—the warmth, the humming noise, the way a tan boosted my confidence. Shortly after I started tanning as a hobby, it also became my career. For 6 years I worked in the tanning salon industry, including 3 years in management. I recruited all of my friends to either work or tan alongside me. I attended trainings to learn about each layer of…

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Tobacco’s Grip on U.S. Veterans

THURSDAY, Jan. 11, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nearly 40 percent of U.S. military veterans smoke or use some form of tobacco. Data from 2010-2015 revealed that 21.6 percent of veterans reported current use (within the past 30 days) of cigarettes, 6.2 percent used cigars, 5.2 percent used smokeless tobacco, 3 percent used roll-your-own tobacco, and 1.5 percent used pipes, according to a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tobacco use was higher among veterans than non-veterans for males and females across all age groups, except…

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New Immunotherapies and Targeted Therapies to Treat Lymphoma

The 2017 American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting was held last month in Atlanta, Georgia. This meeting brings together experts from across the globe so they can discuss new advances in the treatment of different types of blood-related diseases including a group of cancers called lymphoma. In this podcast, Michael E. Williams, MD, ScM, highlights some of the research presented at the meeting that may improve the treatment of lymphoma. A study examined whether adding brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris), a targeted therapy, to a chemotherapy combination used to treat Hodgkin…

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How to Get Your Health on Track for 2018

SATURDAY, Jan. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) — For those still open to adding to their list of New Year’s resolutions, the American Medical Association (AMA) is offering its top 10 healthy suggestions. First, Americans should make an effort to cut back on sugary drinks, medical experts advise. Diabetes screening is also a good proactive step as the new year unfolds. The AMA suggests trying an online tool — a self-screening website — to help you do just that. Go to DoIHavePrediabetes.org. Increasing physical activity is another good idea, based on…

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Best Ways to Quit Smoking, Cut Your Lung Cancer Risk

FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) — While there is no sure way to avoid lung cancer, there are steps you can take to reduce your risk. Smoking contributes to 80 to 90 percent of lung cancer deaths, according to the American Lung Association. Men who smoke have a 23 times increased risk of lung cancer. And exposure to secondhand smoke causes approximately 7,330 lung cancer deaths among nonsmokers in the United States every year. So, if you’ve never smoked, don’t start. If you do smoke, try to quit. Talk…

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4 Things to Ask About Cancer and Hair Loss

Feeling good about yourself during cancer treatment can be challenging, especially as your body goes through physical changes. One of these changes may be losing your hair as a side effect of treatment.  Hair loss, or alopecia, is caused when treatment damages the cells that help hair grow. It is a common side effect of some types of chemotherapy, targeted therapy, radiation therapy, and bone marrow/stem cell transplantation. 1. Who can help me understand my risk for hair loss? Your health care team is there to help explain and manage…

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Chronic Heartburn Tied to Higher Odds for Head, Neck Cancers

THURSDAY, Dec. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Millions of American seniors suffer the discomfort of chronic acid reflux. Now, new research suggests the condition might raise their odds for even more dangerous foes — head and neck cancers. The research can’t prove cause-and-effect, and the odds of any one person with chronic heartburn developing one of these relatively rare cancers remains low, experts noted. But the study of nearly 28,000 Americans over the age of 65 did show a heightened risk. Overall, a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) —…

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